We Pigs News for 08-27-2018


The Woman Who’s Rescued Thousands of Guinea Pigs | CUTE AS FLUFF

Japanese encephalitis is transmitted to pigs as rapidly in Cambodian peri-urban areas as rural areas

Japanese encephalitis virus, which causes acute encephalitis in Eastern and Southern Asia, is traditionally considered a rural disease. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that pigs in a peri-urban and a rural farm were infected by the virus at the same rate. Domestic pigs are considered major hosts, although the disease infects a wide range of vertebrates. JE has long been considered a rural disease, with proximity to rice fields and pig farming known to be risk factors of the disease. In their new work, Juliette Di Francesco, of the Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, Cambodia, and colleagues started their work based on a series of previous studies of JE virus by the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development. 

Francesco and her colleagues followed 15 pigs in a rural farm and 15 pigs in a peri-urban farm. In both cases, they collected blood samples from the pigs every 8 to 11 days in 2015. Each sample was tested for the presence of JE virus antibodies and JE virus RNA. In both groups, all the pigs tested positive for JE virus antibodies by the age of 6 months. The force of infection was similar in both farms, with a force of 0.61 and 0.69 per day in the peri-urban and the rural farm, respectively. 

The researchers detected six different strains of JE virus in the pigs. The pigs became infected later in the rural farm, which may be due to their later loss of maternal antibodies and to the larger amount of pigs in their proximity. Additional larger studies in other urban, peri-urban, and rural settings are needed to confirm these findings. 

Keywords: [“virus”,”pig”,”rural”]
Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180823141030.htm

Mucosal environment of older pigs helps newborn piglets with intestinal injury recover

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that the intestinal mucosal environment of juvenile pigs can stimulate repair of intestinal injuries in newborn piglets. The findings have implications both for understanding why newborns of many species – including humans – are unable to repair these injuries on their own, as well as for potential future treatments. Intestinal ischemic injury occurs when blood flow to a portion of the intestine is cut off, resulting in the loss of epithelial cells that line intestinal walls. Once this barrier is damaged, intestinal contents can leak into the bloodstream, causing sepsis and often fatal infections. Infants are particularly vulnerable to these injuries; this research shows it may be because they lack the ability to quickly repair the damaged areas. 

Ziegler and her team looked at ischemia in 2-week-old and 6-week-old pigs by surgically inducing ischemia in small sections of intestine and then removing the injured tissue for study. They noted that in the juvenile pigs, the uninjured epithelial cells flattened out and resealed the intestinal barrier within a couple of hours. The epithelial cells from the newborn pigs did not flatten or reseal the barrier. The researchers then scraped the mucosal micro-environment – essentially the surface layer – from the 6-week-old intestine and applied it to the newborn intestine, which was then able to repair itself. 

Keywords: [“intestinal”,”repair”,”injury”]
Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180823143925.htm

Guinea Pig Care –

We usually recommend that male pigs, on the other hand, stay single unless they show distinct signs of loneliness. If you are paying attention, you will most likely know if your pig is lonely. Just as some are distinctly lonely by themselves, some pigs are distinctly happy alone and don’t want a mate. It is better to have a single pig who is happy than two pigs who fight. Usually, it’s one pig doing the fighting and the other getting beat up. 

If you already have one pig and want another, the best way to pick the second pig is to let them pick each other. Put your pig and each candidate in a playpen together and see how they interact. Clicking of teeth is a bad sign-if the pigs begin clicking their teeth at each other, the bond will not be a good one. You should give them a good 20 minutes together before taking the second pig home, and you should keep an eye on them the first week or two that they are together. If you are adopting your second pig from us, we do require that you bring your pig with you before we will send them home together. 

We routinely separate fighting pigs and match up lonely ones. So while we can’t guarantee a perfect match, we’ve done everything possible to make sure you won’t have problems when your pigs come home. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”together”,”fight”]
Source: https://rasarescue.org/guineapigcare.htm

The Proper Care of Guinea Pigs: Amazon.co.uk: Peter Gurney: 0018214131519: Books

The previous owner has certainly very much enjoyed reading this book more than once, therefore please be aware there will be some creasing on the spine or slight shelf wear. If it’s been in their collection for some time, say years old or more, some pages might be discoloured and there may be other minor age blemishes, but that won’t affect its readability. Shipped from the heart of the British countryside this book will leave our library within a day or two of your order and be with you shortly thereafter. The condition of this book is as stated above, however this book is slightly damaged in some way. This book is dirty and has significant shelf wear, however all text is there and readable, as such it is acceptable for sale, and is still a good read. 

Thanks. 

Keywords: [“book”,”wear”,”shelf”]
Source: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Proper-Care-Guinea-Pigs/dp/0793831512

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