We Pigs News for 08-05-2018


Things to Avoid to Keep Your Guinea Pigs Healthy

Undercover video shows pig abuse but also common practices

DENVER – Recently released undercover video showing pigs being kicked, hit and punched at a Kentucky supplier for the world’s largest meat producer drew prompt condemnation from animal rights groups and the agricultural industry alike. Ten states – none major pork producers – have passed laws that ban or phase out the use of those narrow metal cages, known as gestation crates or stalls, where sows are confined during their frequent pregnancies. Among them is California, where voters agreed to phase out the crates along with chicken cages and veal crates starting in 2015. Sows account for only about 6 percent of the pigs on American farms, but pork producers have been slow to give up confinement, said Josh Balk, vice president of farm animal protection for The Humane Society of the United States. Still, activists have made an impact with their gradual, state-by-state approach of passing ballot measures and bills to outlaw crates, and by gathering pledges from more than 100 large restaurant and food companies including McDonald’s, Chipotle and Target, to move away from suppliers that use gestation crates. 

The world’s largest pork producer, Smithfield Foods, announced in January it had switched to open group housing for pregnant pigs at its company-owned U.S. farms. JBS’ U.S. branch, based in Greeley, Colorado, suspended shipments from the Franklin, Kentucky, farm after the video was released earlier this month by Los Angeles-based Mercy for Animals, a backer of the California proposal. An estimated 75 percent of U.S. 

pig farms regularly use gestation stalls. Even most of those farms still use gestation stalls when sows are artificially inseminated, and some use them to test whether the sows are pregnant, council spokesman David Warner said. After sows give birth, farms that use confinement usually put them in slightly larger farrowing stalls, which give them enough room to lie down and nurse their piglets. Gestation stalls are intended to minimize fighting among hierarchical sows and protect workers from the pregnant animals, which can weigh between 350 and 450 pounds, said Sarah Crawford, assistant vice president of animal welfare for the National Pork Board in Des Moines, Iowa. Temple Grandin, an animal science professor at Colorado State University and consultant on livestock treatment, said confined pregnant pigs lack the space to turn around, and compared the experience to humans having to spend their lives in an airline seat. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”farm”,”crates”]
Source: https://chinapost.nownews.com/20180731-389580

Video of abuse at pig farm also highlights common practices

Recently released undercover video showing pigs being kicked, hit and punched at a Kentucky supplier for the world’s largest meat producer drew prompt condemnation from animal rights groups and the agricultural industry alike. Among them is California, where voters agreed to phase out the crates along with chicken cages and veal crates starting in 2015. Sows account for only about 6 percent of the pigs on American farms, but pork producers have been slow to give up confinement, said Josh Balk, vice president of farm animal protection for The Humane Society of the United States. Still, activists have made an impact with their gradual, state-by-state approach of passing ballot measures and bills to outlaw crates, and by gathering pledges from more than 100 large restaurant and food companies including McDonald’s, Chipotle and Target, to move away from suppliers that use gestation crates. The world’s largest pork producer, Smithfield Foods, announced in January it had switched to open group housing for pregnant pigs at its company-owned U.S. 

farms. JBS’ U.S. branch, based in Greeley, suspended shipments from the Franklin, Kentucky, farm after the video was released earlier this month by Los Angeles-based Mercy for Animals, a backer of the California proposal. It said it would investigate the incident at the farm operated by Tennessee-based Tosh Farms. An estimated 75 percent of U.S. 

pig farms regularly use gestation stalls. Even most of those farms still use gestation stalls when sows are artificially inseminated, and some use them to test whether the sows are pregnant, council spokesman David Warner said. After sows give birth, farms that use confinement usually put them in slightly larger farrowing stalls, which give them enough room to lie down and nurse their piglets. Gestation stalls are intended to minimize fighting among hierarchical sows and protect workers from the pregnant animals, which can weigh between 350 and 450 pounds, said Sarah Crawford, assistant vice president of animal welfare for the National Pork Board in Des Moines, Iowa. Temple Grandin, an animal science professor at Colorado State University and consultant on livestock treatment, said confined pregnant pigs lack the space to turn around, and compared the experience to humans having to spend their lives in an airline seat. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”farm”,”crates”]
Source: https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/article215821000.html

‘It’s good! It’s good! Pigs have flown! Hell has frozen over!’

Through his eloquent and thoughtful commentary segments, which would become a highlight of his always-thorough nightly sports roundups – and, from 1986 to January 2018, as the impassioned and eminently quotable radio voice of the New Orleans Saints – Henderson would forge a place all his own in the pantheon of New Orleans sports and broadcasting giants. James Harmon Henderson was born July 29, 1947, in Rochester, New York, the son of a fruit farmer and elementary school teacher. Henderson earned an English degree from State University of New York at Cortland, followed by a stint in the Army. Little did those protesters know that Henderson would become a key part of an on-air dream team at WWL that included anchors Angela Hill and Garland Robinette, as well as meteorological guru Nash Roberts. During Henderson’s time at WWL, the station would begin a ratings streak – unparalleled locally and nationally – that would see its newscasts win every key ratings period for 38 years straight. 

In addition to his work on WWL-TV, Henderson in 1986 also become the voice of the New Orleans Saints on WWL-AM, making play-by-play calls alongside color analyst and former Saints quarterback Archie Manning. During their time on the air, many local Saints fans began the long-held local tradition of turning down the volume on the national TV broadcasts of Saints games and instead letting Henderson and Manning do the talking. After the departure of Manning, Henderson would be teamed in the booth with Saints veterans Hokie Gajan and, later, Deuce McAllister. In 2012, Henderson went into semi-retirement, leaving WWL for a gig as an in-season football analyst at crosstown rival WVUE-Fox 8, while still doing play-by-play duties for Saints radio broadcasts. He final call as the Saints’ play-by-play man came on the last play of the team’s heart-wrenching playoff loss to the Minnesota Vikings, when the Vikings won the game on a last-second, 61-yard touchdown. 

In July 2018, former Saints offensive lineman Zach Strief was announced as Henderson’s replacement in the booth, pairing him with analyst and former Saints running back McAllister. Henderson has been named Louisiana Sportscaster of the year 13 times by the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association. 

Keywords: [“Henderson”,”Saints”,”New”]
Source: https://www.nola.com/300/2018/07/jim_henderson_wwl_saints_new_o.html

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