We Pigs News for 06-26-2018


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Fiber effects in nutrition and gut health in pigs

Dietary fiber has an important role in pig and poultry diets and a minimum level of dietary fiber has to be included to maintain normal physiological function in the digestive tract. The positive effects of enzyme addition is due to disruption of intact cell walls and release of entrapped nutrients or due to the changes in the physical properties of non-starch polysaccharides, such as viscosity and WHC, and/or changes in the composition and content of bacteria in the small and large intestine [23-25]. Reducing particle size has been reported to improve the feed efficiency and nutrient digestion of weaned pigs [19, 21]. There appears to be a particle size by age of pig interaction in digestibility, resulting in a larger response in young as compared to older pigs. This resulted in greater capacity of sows to digest fibrous components compared to young pigs and it was shown that sows digest a larger part of the NSP in the small intestine than growing pigs. 

Crossbred Large White Yorkshire pigs show higher growth rate and better feed conversion than native Mong Cai pigs, when fed the same daily amount of DM and CP [34, 35]. This is due to greater potential for lean tissue accretion in LY than in MC pigs, as reflected in higher nitrogen retention [34, 35]. However, indigenous breeds, such as the MC breed, may have better characteristics with regards to reproduction and are adapted to the local climate. A longer MRT in the indigenous MC pig can be explained by a larger GIT, reflected in more gut content, as compared to LY pigs. In accordance, it was reported that differences in gut content could explain the longer MRT in Iberian pigs than in Landrace pigs. 

Earlier studies on indigenous and exotic pig breeds support the contention of greater length of the GIT in the indigenous pigs [.36,.40]. In addition, recent studies show that there are interactions between breed and diet on LAB count and in the concentration of propionic acid in the ileum. Increased fibre level in the diet in combination with high soluble fiber content had a greater impact on the LAB count and the concentration of propionic acid in the ileum of MC pigs than of LY pigs. This suggests differences in the gut microbiota activity and/or composition between MC and LY pigs. Mong Cai pigs had shorter villi, smaller villus width and greater crypt density in the ileum than LY pigs. 

The MC pigs had a longer total tract mean retention time of solids than the LY pigs allowing for longer contact between digestion products and absorptive surfaces. The inclusion of chicory forage and root in a cereal-based diet results in changes in gut micro-environment and gut morphology of pigs , while growth performance was unaffected and digestibility was only marginally reduced by chicory inclusion [29, 57]. Within diet type, these changes followed a similar pattern in the small and large intestine. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”gut”,”Dietary”]
Source: https://jasbsci.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2049-1891-5-15

Fiber effects in nutrition and gut health in pigs

Dietary fiber has an important role in pig and poultry diets and a minimum level of dietary fiber has to be included to maintain normal physiological function in the digestive tract. The positive effects of enzyme addition is due to disruption of intact cell walls and release of entrapped nutrients or due to the changes in the physical properties of non-starch polysaccharides, such as viscosity and WHC, and/or changes in the composition and content of bacteria in the small and large intestine [23, 24, 25].Reducing particle size has been reported to improve the feed efficiency and nutrient digestion of weaned pigs [19, 21]. There appears to be a particle size by age of pig interaction in digestibility, resulting in a larger response in young as compared to older pigs. This resulted in greater capacity of sows to digest fibrous components compared to young pigs and it was shown that sows digest a larger part of the NSP in the small intestine than growing pigs. Crossbred Large White Yorkshire pigs show higher growth rate and better feed conversion than native Mong Cai pigs, when fed the same daily amount of DM and CP [34, 35]. 

This is due to greater potential for lean tissue accretion in LY than in MC pigs, as reflected in higher nitrogen retention [34, 35].However, indigenous breeds, such as the MC breed, may have better characteristics with regards to reproduction and are adapted to the local climate. A longer MRT in the indigenous MC pig can be explained by a larger GIT, reflected in more gut content, as compared to LY pigs. In accordance, it was reported that differences in gut content could explain the longer MRT in Iberian pigs than in Landrace pigs. Earlier studies on indigenous and exotic pig breeds support the contention of greater length of the GIT in the indigenous pigs [36, 40]. In addition, recent studies show that there are interactions between breed and diet on LAB count and in the concentration of propionic acid in the ileum. 

Increased fibre level in the diet in combination with high soluble fiber content had a greater impact on the LAB count and the concentration of propionic acid in the ileum of MC pigs than of LY pigs. This suggests differences in the gut microbiota activity and/or composition between MC and LY pigs. Mong Cai pigs had shorter villi, smaller villus width and greater crypt density in the ileum than LY pigs. The MC pigs had a longer total tract mean retention time of solids than the LY pigs allowing for longer contact between digestion products and absorptive surfaces. The inclusion of chicory forage and root in a cereal-based diet results in changes in gut micro-environment and gut morphology of pigs , while growth performance was unaffected and digestibility was only marginally reduced by chicory inclusion [29, 57]. 

Within diet type, these changes followed a similar pattern in the small and large intestine. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”gut”,”Dietary”]
Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/2049-1891-5-15

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