We Pigs News for 06-01-2018

We Pigs News for 05-29-2018

The types of antibiotics used by 110 pig farms in the Ashanti region and the handling practices of the farmers during disease management were assessed. Misdiagnosis and inadequate protection during antibiotic handling in the farms increased the risk of antibiotic resistance development and spread. The factors affecting antibiotic resistance development and spread are rife in pig farms in Ashanti region and appropriate education and veterinary interventions are needed to prevent resistant bacteria from becoming endemic in pork and pig farm communities. The use of antimicrobials in livestock and the husbandry practices of the farmers have been implicated as a cause of antibiotic resistance [2, 3]. Pig farmers use antibiotics for treatment, metaphylaxis, prophylaxis, and growth promotion in their farm animals [1, 2, 4]. 

The relatively larger farm animal populations consume more than half the antibiotics produced globally [4-6]. Diseases among pigs tend to reduce productivity by reducing feed conversion efficiency, slowing growth rate, and increasing mortalities. Because of the central role of antibiotics in disease management, a study of prevalent diseases and their management practices will aid in informing practical interventions that will aim at reducing the development and spread of antibiotic resistance as a result of antibiotic use in disease management. The absence of data on the type of antibiotics used and their handling practices on pig farms, especially in Ghana and Africa, is detrimental to our understanding of the factors leading to antibiotic resistance. As a step to encourage surveillance studies that shall help researchers track the factors influencing bacterial resistance, this study assessed the antibiotic types and their handling practices among pig farmers in disease management, allowing for recommendations to contain and prevent the development and spread of resistant bacteria through the food chain. 

Table 1: Types of antibiotics used by pig farmers in selected districts in the Ashanti region of Ghana. The types and handling practices of antibiotics used in both clinical and veterinary medicine have been implicated in the development and spread of resistant bacterial phenotypes that is affecting the therapeutic efficacy of current antibiotics and food security [1, 2, 7]. This study aimed at assessing the practices and types of antibiotics prevalent on Ghanaian pig farms, using the Ashanti region as a case study. The use of antibiotics intended for clinical use is advised against as a cause of the spread of antibiotic resistance from farms to communities and treatment centres [3, 7]. Hence, the use of mainly veterinary antibiotics for basically therapeutic purposes among the farms reduces the risks of antibiotics resistance development and spread. 

Nevertheless, the farms mainly depended on the tetracyclines, sulphadimidine, dihydrostreptomycin, and benzylpenicillin for the management of most diseases. The farmers depended more on fellow farmers than veterinarians for antibiotic knowledge, which resulted in the use of the same antibiotics and similar handling practices among farms in close proximity or within the same district. Errors in antibiotic handling and administration were common among the farms. Inadequate knowledge about antibiotics and their effect on the environment and public health among pig farmers made them use and dispose of antibiotics imprudently, increasing the risk of antibiotic resistance development and spread. Education on the importance of pro- and prebiotics, improved farm hygienic practices, strict laws regarding the sales, and use of antibiotics and increased veterinarian interventions on the farms are important to limit the occurrence of diseases and subsequent use of antibiotics. 

Keywords: [“antibiotic”,”farm”,”pig”]
Source: http://www.wepigs.com/we-pigs-news-for-05-29-2018

Pigs Digest Fiber Efficiently Even at High Inclusion Rates, Study Finds

URBANA, Ill. – The use of high-fiber feed ingredients in swine diets is on the rise due to their wide availability and relatively low cost. Because pigs lack enzymes needed to digest dietary fiber, the energy available to pigs from these ingredients is less than lower-fiber ingredients. NatureLong-term Study Shows Crop Rotation Decreases Greenhouse Gas EmissionsURBANA, Ill. – Many farmers grow corn and soybean in rotation to avoid the continuous corn yield penalty, but now there’s another reason to rotate. Scientists at the University of Illinois have provided further evidence that rotating crops increases yield and lowers greenhouse gas emissions compared to continuous corn or soybean. PsychologySleep Better, Parent Better: Study Shows Link Between Maternal Sleep And Permissive ParentingURBANA, Ill. – Research has shown that consistently not getting enough sleep, or getting poor quality sleep, can put you at risk for a number of health conditions. 

MedicineHunting Dogs May Benefit from Antioxidant Boost in DietURBANA, Ill. – Free radicals, those DNA-damaging single-oxygen atoms, are produced in spades during exercise. MedicineWalnuts Impact Gut Microbiome And Improve HealthURBANA, Ill. – Diets rich in nuts, such as walnuts, have been shown to play a role in heart health and in reducing colorectal cancer. According to a new study from the University of Illinois, the way walnuts impact the gut microbiome-the collection of trillions of microbes or bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract-may be behind some of those health benefits. BiologyStudy Provides Video Evidence of Parental Infanticide in a Grassland Bird SpeciesURBANA, Ill. – Baby birds go missing from their nests all the time. In a new study from the University of Illinois, the mysterious and fatal behavior is documented in dickcissels for the first time. 

BiologyMore Than Just Menageries: First Look at Zoo And Aquarium Research Shows High OutputURBANA, Ill. – Most of us think of zoos and aquariums as family destinations: educational but fun diversions for our animal-loving kids. NatureFrom Property Damage to Lost Production: How Natural Disasters Impact EconomicsURBANA, Ill. – When a natural disaster strikes, major disaster databases tend to compile information about losses such as damages to property or cost of repairs, but other economic impacts after the disaster are often overlooked-such as how a company’s lost ability to produce products may affect the entire supply-chain within the affected region and in other regions. 

Keywords: [“Ill.”,”Study”,”Illinois”]
Source: http://www.sciencenewsline.com/summary/2018053018180076.html

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