We Pigs News for 05-31-2018

NOT-OD-15-158: NIH Research Involving Introduction of Human Pluripotent Cells into Non-Human Vertebrate Animal Pre-Gastrulation Embryos

The National Institutes of Health is informing the research community that it will not fund research in which human pluripotent cells are introduced into non-human vertebrate animal pre-gastrulation stage embryos while the Agency considers a possible policy revision in this area. The field of regenerative medicine, largely through the use of human pluripotent cells, has progressed to the stage in which some scientists are considering employing early stage animal embryos to grow human tissue and organs. This section governs research using hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells, i.e., human cells that are capable of dividing without differentiating for a prolonged period in culture and are known to develop into cells and tissues of the three primary germ layers. Research in which hESCs or human induced pluripotent stem cells are introduced into non-human primate blastocysts. Research involving the breeding of animals where the introduction of hESCs or human induced pluripotent stem cells may contribute to the germ line. 

Given the rapid expansion of potential research models employed beyond the scope described above, NIH would like to undertake a deliberative process to evaluate the state of the science in this area, the ethical issues that should be considered, and the relevant animal welfare concerns associated with these types of studies. Effective with the date of this Notice, NIH will not fund any new or competing grant applications or contract proposals for research in which human pluripotent cells are introduced into non-human vertebrate animal pre-gastrulation stage embryos. Current research funding: NIH will not consider requests for administrative supplements or revisions to any grants or modification to R&D contracts that include costs for or involve research introducing human pluripotent cells into non-human vertebrate animal pre-gastrulation stage embryos. Ongoing NIH awards will be addressed with the awardees on a case-by-case basis. Peer reviewed competing applications: Any grant applications previously submitted to the NIH and already reviewed which propose to introduce human pluripotent cells into non-human vertebrate animal pre-gastrulation stage embryos will be held for funding decisions until NIH has issued a policy notification. 

Competing applications/contract proposals pending submission and/or peer review: NIH will not review applications or contract proposals for research proposing to introduce human pluripotent cells into non-human vertebrate animal pre-gastrulation stage embryos until NIH has issued a policy notification. No contracts proposing research in which human pluripotent cells are introduced into non-human vertebrate animal pre-gastrulation stage embryos will be awarded until further notice. 

Keywords: [“human”,”cells”,”research”]
Source: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-15-158.html

Moveable Magnets Used to Forge Gastric Bypass in Pigs

MONDAY, May 21 – In a scenario reminiscent of the film Fantastic Voyage, researchers have found a way to perform nearly surgery-free gastric bypass procedures in pigs using only a local anesthetic. The procedure, done with moveable magnets, is completed in less than a half-hour, the researchers said, and reroutes the digestive tract without leaving behind any foreign material. Thompson, an assistant professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, is presenting his findings at the Digestive Disease Week meeting of gastroenterologists in San Diego. Gastric or intestinal bypass surgery is effective treatment against obesity, diabetes and even some cancers and involves rerouting different parts of the intestine so that certain areas of the digestive tract are no longer needed. The procedure typically involves invasive surgery, with all its attendant complications and risks. 

The procedure used in this study is called SAMSEN. Here, researchers inserted two magnets via a catheter into the foregut and the hindgut of five pigs. Within a few days this method worked to create a surgical bypass that connected two previously separate parts of the gastrointestinal tract. The procedure, if validated in other animal models and in humans, might someday aid in the fight against obesity, diabetes and even some forms of cancer, the authors stated. Similar procedures have been tried before but they involved just one magnet, meaning that only small bypasses could be performed. 

Currently, capsule endoscopies rely on the digestive tract’s natural movements to move it through the system. The human volunteer in this study was the study’s senior author, 69-year-old Naotake Ohtsuka, president of Mu Ltd., which developed the device. In a third and final study being presented at the meeting, researchers determined that a new high-definition, dual-focus colonoscope may enable doctors to diagnose during a colonoscopy whether small polyps in the colon are benign or malignant. 

Keywords: [“study”,”procedure”,”digestive”]
Source: https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=158428

My guinea pig has crusty dry skin on her lower back. I gave her a “bath” but the crustiness still exists. It is almost

There are two likely possibilities for what your GP is experiencing. The most likely by far is a mite infestation specifically sarcoptes mites. We see this sometimes on a weekly basis in our clinic. These mites can travel in by other guinea pigs, food, bedding, or be in the guinea pigs and not causing a problem until one day they come out of dormancy and start to cause your pig pain or itchiness or both. The skin becomes very flaky and progresses to having the hair fall out very easily. 

If this condition is present it is not an emergency but does require veterinary attention to give the right meds to get rid of the mites. The other possibility but much less likely is ringworm. This can come from a lot of places in the environment and can cause the symptoms you are describing. I would avoid lotions for a couple of reasons, most guinea pigs do not find the humor in topical meds, some lotions have ingredients and perfumes that GP’s don’t like, and third the lotions are usually very ineffective. Dr. 

Dan and 87 other Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”mite”,”lotions”]
Source: https://www.justanswer.com/veterinary/268tq-hi-my-guinea-pig…

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