We Pigs News for 04-11-2018

Ninja Guinea Pig – Fortitude Valley Vet

Anti-viral components in soybean meal may promote growth and health in pigs

URBANA, Ill. – Swine diets are carefully formulated to provide the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fats. Feeding soybean meal as part of pig diets is nothing new. The ingredient may have been quietly promoting growth and health of pigs all along, but its effects may have been masked by the routine use of in-feed antibiotics. With the advent of the U.S. Veterinary Feed Directive, which mandates more judicious use of in-feed antibiotics, producers are wondering what alternatives are out there. 

Dilger and Brooke Smith, lead author of the article and graduate researcher in the Veterinary Medical Scholars Program at U of I, were invited by the board of the Journal of Animal Science to review the state of knowledge on soybean-derived isoflavones and saponins. In the article, Smith details the use of soy and its processed forms in swine diets, and reviews research from rodent, pig, and human studies on the cellular activity of isoflavones and saponins. The research shows soy isoflavones and saponins have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects on a cellular level. They also promote growth and help pigs return to health faster after PRRSV infection. The existing studies were either done in a laboratory or in a highly controlled setting over a short period, so it’s difficult to say what effect the compounds might have in a realistic production setting, with the stress of weaning, group housing, and other real-world factors. 

Smith is poised to launch a long-term study set in a full production context, to isolate the effects of isoflavones on pigs infected with the PRRS virus. Results are probably a year away, but Dilger and Smith are optimistic about the potential of soy-derived isoflavones and saponins as growth and health promoters in the industry. They suggest there could be a future in which pigs are fed a greater proportion of soybean meal or other specialized soy products at an earlier stage after weaning. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”isoflavones”,”saponins”]
Source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-03/uoic-aci032918.php

PTSD in the Slaughterhouse

The majority of these facilities slaughter and process animals, collectively employing thousands of workers who turn a constant stream of live creatures into an array of profitable by-products. A farm animal entering the front door will reach the exit about 19 minutes later. The emerging literature, including a study by the University of Windsor, on the psychological effects of slaughterhouse work on humans is startling. Rarely noted is the fact that the slaughterhouse is a site of unfathomable connectivity. The most intimate and bloodstained bond between humans and the animals we consume is forged between nearly voiceless slaughterhouse workers and the animals they’re employed to kill. 

Slaughterhouse employees are not only exposed to a battery of physical dangers on the cut floor, but the psychological weight of their work erodes their well being. As slaughterhouse workers are increasingly being treated for post-traumatic stress disorder, researchers are finally starting to systematically explore the results of killing sentient animals for a living. Amy Fitzgerald, a criminology professor at the University of Windsor in Canada, has found a strong correlation between the presence of a large slaughterhouse and high crime rates in U.S. communities. One might object that a slaughterhouse town’s disproportionate population of poor, working-class males might be the real cause, but Fitzgerald controlled for that possibility by comparing her data to counties with comparable populations employed in factory-like operations. 

Naturally, in food-conscious places such as Austin, there will be a conspicuous percentage of consumers who buy animal products sourced from small farms and think themselves absolved from all this messiness. Animal products these days are sold with a story: the animal was humanely raised, it was cage-free, it was free-ranged, it was pasture-fed, it’s hormone-free. Excluded from these stories is the fact that an animal was killed. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”slaughterhouse”,”work”]
Source: https://www.texasobserver.org/ptsd-in

Anti-viral Components in Soybean Meal May Promote Growth and Health in Pigs

Swine diets are carefully formulated to provide the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fats. Feeding soybean meal as part of pig diets is nothing new. The ingredient may have been quietly promoting growth and health of pigs all along, but its effects may have been masked by the routine use of in-feed antibiotics. With the advent of the U.S. Veterinary Feed Directive, which mandates more judicious use of in-feed antibiotics, producers are wondering what alternatives are out there. 

Dilger and Brooke Smith, lead author of the article and graduate researcher in the Veterinary Medical Scholars Program at U of I, were invited by the board of the Journal of Animal Science to review the state of knowledge on soybean-derived isoflavones and saponins. In the article, Smith details the use of soy and its processed forms in swine diets, and reviews research from rodent, pig, and human studies on the cellular activity of isoflavones and saponins. The research shows soy isoflavones and saponins have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects on a cellular level. They also promote growth and help pigs return to health faster after PRRSV infection. The existing studies were either done in a laboratory or in a highly controlled setting over a short period, so it’s difficult to say what effect the compounds might have in a realistic production setting, with the stress of weaning, group housing, and other real-world factors. 

Smith is poised to launch a long-term study set in a full production context, to isolate the effects of isoflavones on pigs infected with the PRRS virus. Results are probably a year away, but Dilger and Smith are optimistic about the potential of soy-derived isoflavones and saponins as growth and health promoters in the industry. They suggest there could be a future in which pigs are fed a greater proportion of soybean meal or other specialized soy products at an earlier stage after weaning. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”isoflavones”,”saponins”]
Source: https://www.goldeaglecoop.com/news/anti-viral-components-in…

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