We Pigs News for 01-26-2018

Patients ‘should not be guinea pigs’

Patients must not be used as guinea pigs, says an inquiry into a controversial trial of ventilators on babies, some of whom died. Professor Rod Griffiths, who headed the investigation, said a further review was needed of the way research is performed throughout the NHS. I believe this report will create a foundation for successful research in the NHS, while increasing the confidence of patients that research is done properly and that people are not being used as guinea pigs. His report into the alleged incidents at North Staffordshire Hospital called for new measures to ensure vital parental consent is obtained. The report was published after a 15-month inquiry into the controversial treatment involving a new type of ventilator at the hospital. Professor Griffiths revealed that allegations of forged consent forms have been passed to the General Medical Council. Professor Griffiths said that the Department of Health, professional medical bodies and regulators should co-operate to draw up clear guidance for the issue of consent during clinical trials. The report also heard evidence on the use of covert surveillance cameras to detect parents who physically abuse their children in hospital in an attempt to draw attention to themselves. “I believe this report will create a foundation for successful research in the NHS, while increasing the confidence of patients that research is done properly and that people are not being used as guinea pigs.” The report panel said: “What was totally unacceptable to those interviewed was the apparent lack of adequate explanation, of choice and of consequent properly elicited and recorded consent.” The ventilators are no longer used for premature babies, but are still used for infants. Following publication of the report, David Fillingham of the trust said: “There are a number of lessons that need to be learned.” “Mrs Henshall welcomed the report. She said:”There were no easy answers to the concerns we were raising and the whole ethos around research in general. “The report goes a long way and it’s extremely thorough to reassure the public that there’s greater protection.” The Continuous Negative Extrathoracic Pressure ventilator used in the trial works in the opposite way to a traditional ventilator, using the same principles as an iron lung. Health Minster Lord Hunt said he accepted all the report’s recommendations.

Keywords: [“report”,”consent”,”research”]
Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/737688.stm

British Association of Rodentologists

We provide training courses to members of the public, to those working with rodents and to veterinary professionals with the aim of improving rodent and guinea pig medical care and welfare. The Rodent Health Advisory course is the most important part of a rodentologist’s training. Qualified Rodentologists fill the gap in veterinary training, which is based mainly on cats, dogs and farm animals and does not include a specific study or examination on naturally occurring disease within the rodent/guinea pig species. Part of the RHA course is a two day residential training at the Cambridge Cavy Trust/CCT in Huntingdon, just north of Cambridge, UK. This residential stay may be completed in either two consecutive days or on two separate occasions. There are a limited number of training places available so early booking is advised. THE TRAINING COURSES. In terms of animal welfare and general veterinary knowledge, the RHA course is the most important training pack. You cannot undertake the GBAR course until you have successfully completed the RHA course. Rodent Health AdvisoryNo formal qualifications are required to undertake this course. Consists of:RHA home study materials – £130.2 days training at the CCT – £80 eachCase history examination – £20.Examination marking fee – £40.RHA badge – £20. Anatomy GBARConsists of:Home study materials – £135.10-module examination pack registration fee – £20.Examination attendance fee – £10 per module Examination marking fee – £40 upon completion of all 10 modules. Physiology GBARConsists of:Home study materials – £150.10-module examination pack registration fee – £20.Examination attendance fee – £10 per module. Examination marking fee – £40 upon completion of all 10 modules. Pharmacology GBARConsists of:Home study materials – £150.10-module examination pack registration fee – £20.Examination attendance fee – £10 per module Examination marking fee – £40 upon completion of all 10 modules. You will be required to attend the Cambridge Cavy Trust on one or more pre-arranged Sundays between the hours of 10am and 6pm. Each of the 3 GBAR course parts are divided into 10 modules and exam papers may be taken either one at a time, or several at a time, according to your wishes. Payments for the courses may be made via PayPal, credit/debit card, or cheque.

Keywords: [“course”,”fee”,”trained”]
Source: http://www.barrodentology.co.uk

guinea pig care and gifts

Care links: home food habitats health boys & girls cavy lifeThese care pages serve as a basic overview of guinea pig care. To ensure the best life for your guinea pig, you must provide not only food and shelter, but also companionship and care. Sites listed under the “Care” section on the CavyMadness Links page also delve deeper into medical care for your guinea pig. Find a vet who is experienced with guinea pigs! Many vets can be certified as exotics vets without treating any guinea pigs. It is also important to know your guinea pig’s weight, since weight loss is one of the most common signs of illness in a guinea pig. As a new guinea pig owner, you must visit your vet so you can understand how to do a quick examination of your guinea pig at home, and to get a baseline weight of your pig. A congested guinea pig is a sad, frightened guinea pig. Guinea pigs can pick up germs from humans, so if you have a cold, handle your guinea pig only as necessary, and wash your hands before preparing food and picking up your pig. Some calcium is good for your guinea pig, but calcium-rich foods, such as alfalfa, must be fed sparingly to avoid getting a surplus of calcium in your guinea pig’s system. A guinea pig’s teeth grow continuously, so it is important that your pig has enough hay and other roughage in his diet to wear the teeth down. To quote Seagull, this wise guru of guinea: … if you happen to come across a guinea pig in your daily travels, chances are that it’s going to be in the middle of a nap, or about ready to take one. A flat-out piggy is cute indeed, but you should note when your guinea pig has a change in habits; instinctively, sick guinea pigs will separate themselves from the herd, and they will also sleep more to conserve energy. The Peter Gurney Guinea Pig Pages is UK-based, so some products may not be familiar to those living outside the UK. But the information is valuable to anyone who wants a better understanding of the illnesses that affect guinea pigs. If you have a male long-haired guinea pig, check to make sure that long hairs around his genital area are not getting stuck in the penis Although a Peruvian guinea pig with hair flowing on the ground is a beautiful sight, trimming the hair results in less matting and general ease of care for a pet guinea pig. Many guinea pigs can be held without a struggle to be clipped; some guinea pigs need to be wrapped tightly in a towel.

Keywords: [“pig”,”guinea”,”vet”]
Source: http://www.cavymadness.com/care/health.html

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