We Pigs News for 01-11-2018

Guinea Pig Playpen

Health Benefits

Vitamin E. In addition to being higher in omega-3s and CLA, meat from grassfed animals is also higher in vitamin E. The graph below shows vitamin E levels in meat from: 1) feedlot cattle, 2) feedlot cattle given high doses of synthetic vitamin E, and 3) cattle raised on fresh pasture with no added supplements. The meat from the pastured cattle is four times higher in vitamin E than the meat from the feedlot cattle and, interestingly, almost twice as high as the meat from the feedlot cattle given vitamin E supplements. Grass-fed meats improve fat levels Eating moderate amounts of grass-fed meat for only 4 weeks will give you healthier levels of essential fats, according to a 2011 study in the British Journal of Nutrition. Interestingly, volunteers who consumed conventional, grain-fed meat ended up with lower levels of omega-3s and higher levels of omega-6s than they had at the beginning of the study, suggesting that eating conventional meat had been detrimental to their health. European health authorities are not convinced that it’s safe to ingest the small amounts of chlorine that remain on the meat and concluded that lifting the ban would “Threaten the community’s entire set of food production standards.” Be a “Meat and Spinach” or a “Meat and Red Wine” Kind of Guy Eating red meat-but not white meat or fish-is linked with a moderately increased risk of colon cancer. Does eating grass-fed meat also reduce your risk of colon cancer? Meat from pastured animals has more antioxidants than feedlot meat, so it is a distinct possibility. What’s more, 1) the animals weighed less than animals that were allowed to stay on pasture, 2) their meat was tougher, and 3) the meat lost more moisture when cooked. As long as beef producers are not accountable for the ultimate nutritional value of the meat, they will continue to formulate feedlot diets on a least cost basis and American consumers will continue to eat meat that is artificially high in fat and low in vitamin E, beta carotene, omega-3 fatty acids, and CLA. Grassfed Jerky Beef and buffalo jerky fit well into a busy lifestyle. Meat from cattle raised on grass and legumes is not only five times higher in CLA than meat from feedlot cattle, it is also higher in vitamin E, beta carotene, and omega-3 fatty acids. 102(4): 549-50.). New findings on CLA clarify the benefits of meat and dairy products Conjugated linoleic acid or CLA has demonstrated a multitude of benefits in animal studies, including fat reduction, increase in lean muscle mass, reduced risk of diabetes, reversal of arteriosclerosis, and a marked reduction in tumor growth. Compared with animals fed supplemental grain, meat from cattle raised on pasture alone was lower in saturated fat, but higher in the “good fats,” including monounsaturated fats, omega-3 fats, and CLA. Commented the researchers, “These data indicate that many Irish beef producers, due to their grass-based production systems, have a natural advantage in producing beef that is more beneficial to human health than beef produced from concentrate-based systems. Meat from grassfed animals has about half the fat as meat from grainfed animals and significantly fewer calories. Meat from sheep raised on pasture has twice as much lutein as meat from grain-fed sheep-yet another nutritional advantage of raising animals naturally. Meat from grassfed cattle is four times higher in vitamin E In addition to being higher in omega-3s, CLA, and beta-carotene, grassfed beef is much higher in vitamin E. The graph below shows vitamin E levels in meat from: 1) feedlot cattle, 2) feedlot cattle given high dose supplements of vitamin E, and 3) cattle raised on fresh pasture with no added supplements.

Keywords: [“Meat”,”CLA”,”pasture”]
Source: http://www.eatwild.com/healthbenefits.htm

Important aspects of gut health-promoting pig diets are: reduced content of protein that is fermented in the pigs’ gut, minimal buffering capacity, minimal content of anti-nutritional factors, and supply of beneficial compounds such as immunoglobulins. A large number of feed additives have been evaluated that are aimed at enhancing the pig’s immune response, reducing pathogen load in the pig’s gut, stimulate establishment of beneficial gut microbes, and stimulate digestive function. Large amounts of research have been conducted evaluating the impact of a wide range of feed ingredients and feed additives on various aspects of gut health and development in pigs. The emphasis is on a newly-weaned pig, but concepts may be relevant to older pigs as well. These changes are influenced by the pigs’ environment, feeding strategies, age at weaning, and pig genotype and are mediated by psychological and behavioural stress. Tested the hypothesis that feeding diets supplemented with inulin and benzoic acid will reduce faecal ETEC shedding and the incidence of PWD, following oral dosing of pigs after weaning with 3 ml of broth containing 3 107, 2 109, 1 1010 and 5 108 colony-forming units of a freshly grown strain of ETEC serotype O149:K91: K88. Dietary supplementation with inulin, either alone or in combination with benzoic acid, reduced the number of days of diarrhoea in pigs weaned at 21 days of age without significantly affecting average ETEC shedding. Alternative products to SDPP have been studied and in recent times, numerous experiments have examined feeding bovine colostrum products to weanling pigs. Selected feed additives A large number of feed additives have been evaluated that are aimed at either enhancing the pigs’ immune response, reducing pathogen load in the pig’s gut, stimulate establishment of beneficial gut microbes, and stimulate digestive function. The positive effects of feeding acids to pigs on gut health and development, and indirectly on pig health and productivity, may be attributed to various factors, including: antimicrobial activity of non-dissociated organic acids; lowering digesta pH, in particular in the stomach, aiding protein digestion; lowering stomach emptying rate; stimulating enzyme production and activity in the small intestine; and providing nutrients that are preferred by intestinal tissue thereby enhancing mucosal integrity and function. Because of these beneficial and synergistic effects, different combinations of organic and inorganic acids are used widely in diets for newly-weaned pigs, and used increasingly in diets for growing-finishing pigs and sows. The effectiveness of feeding acids to pigs will vary with the types and combinations of acid, the animal’s state and feed characteristics, in particular the diet’s buffering capacity. The latter likely contributes to the observed larger positive effects of feeding potassium-diformate on growth performance of pigs, as compared to other forms of formate. Conclusions Large amounts of research have been conducted evaluating the impact of a wide range of feed ingredients and feed additives on various aspects of gut health and development in pigs, in order to improve growth performance around the time of weaning while minimizing the use of antibiotics and rather expensive feed ingredients, such as milk products. A large number of feed additives have been evaluated that are aimed at enhancing the pig’s immune response, reducing pathogen load in the pig’s gut, stimulate establishment of beneficial 131 gut microbes, and stimulate digestive function. Impact of feeding fermentable proteins and carbohydrates on growth performance, gut health and gastrointestinal function of newly-weaned pigs.

Keywords: [“pig”,”feed”,”diet”]
Source: http://prairieswine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/LS-de-Lange-2010.pdf

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