We Pigs News for 06-02-2018

Inside the human guinea pig capital of North America

These volunteers are in the right spot for this odd line of work: Montreal is the clinical testing capital of North America. Over half of these tests are performed for drugs for sale in Europe, where in many cases stricter laws and higher costs make such testing prohibitive. In Canada, a menu of name brand drugs that ring up annual sales of $28 billion are set to move to the generic market over the next three years, and each one must be tested on human guinea pigs beforehand. There is a booming industry ahead for Quebec’s contract research organizations, hired by drug companies to recruit volunteers and test their drugs, including Algorithme and competitors Anapharm and MDS Pharma Service, the three biggest in the country. Internal Health Canada documents, newly obtained by Maclean’s, show how the government agency was seemingly unaware of the extent of a tuberculosis outbreak in 2005 during a test until three months after the fact-when an American journalist called looking for answers. 

The 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in the world all have operations in Quebec, and with them have come dozens of generic drug companies, who, like the name brands, require fast, reliable, government-sanctioned testing of their wares. The federal government further obliged these companies in 2001, when the clinical trial review period was slashed; suddenly it took half the time for pharmaceutical companies to have their drug tests approved by Health Canada. Health Canada’s oversight was put to the test in the fall of 2005, when a volunteer with tuberculosis infected 20 people during an Anapharm-sponsored study. In the of fall 2005, Anapharm had recruited 20 subjects in a clinical test of ISA 247, an experimental immunosuppressant drug produced by Alberta-based Isotechnika. Apart from a Health Canada list of non-binding guidelines suggesting companies should test patients for tuberculosis, little has changed since. 

During a recent visit to an Algorithme clinical trial, Maclean’s found several participants who drank alcohol and took prescription medication when both are explicitly forbidden during the testing period. Many of these participants, some who were decades-long veterans of the trade, were well versed in what the company tested for-and what it didn’t. 

Keywords: [“test”,”Canada”,”Health”]
Source: https://www.macleans.ca/society/health/inside-the-human-guinea-pig…

Nourishing Ideas: Pig’s Blood

Although I’ve served a variety of sausages at Park Kitchen in the last five years, I had never put blood sausage on the menu before now. The composition of pig’s blood is mostly water at 77%, with 7.2% albumin, 14.5% globulins, 0.3% fibrin, 0.2% fat and 0.8% other odds and ends. In traditional blood puddings, the blood is poached with cream and eggs, in addition to other solids for structure, usually cooked onions and bacon. According to God’s law, it is forbidden in Jewish and Muslim cultures, although even religious nations have culinary traditions using the blood of animals, especially that perfect culinary creature, the pig. Throughout western Europe, there are various sausages or puddings made from pig’s blood; the Spanish morcilla, Catalonian botifarra, the French boudin noir, sometimes garnished with apples, the German blutwurst, the Polish kaszanka, usually containing buckwheat, the Irish drisheen, made from sheep’s blood, cream, oatmeal and tansy, the Finnish preparation of mustamakkara, a blood sausage with ground pork and crushed rye, usually eaten with lingonberry jam. 

Swedish blodpalt is a potato dumpling enriched with blood, and Finland also makes a mykyrokka, a potato and offal soup containing myky, a dumpling of rye flour and blood. In the far east as well, the Koreans make soondae, the Filipino’s make dinuguan, a spicy meat stew with pig’s blood and rice cakes. In Viet Nam, doi huyet is a pig’s blood sausage make with herbs and shrimp paste. The Thai’s have a spicy curry mee, and there is the famous Taiwanese ti hoeh koe, a pig’s blood cake made with sticky rice, then rolled in ground peanuts and cilantro, served on a stick! Pig’s blood cookery is nothing new to the world. 

Elsewhere in Portland, Xocolatl de David has a wonderful pig’s blood chocolate ganache, and Le Pigeon restaurant has served a very tasty pig’s blood pappardelle. Portland’s culinary talents are exploring pig’s blood. 

Keywords: [“blood”,”pig”,”sausage”]
Source: http://nourishingideas.blogspot.com/2009/11/pigs-blood.html

Animal handling safety and health procedures

Air exchanges within the animal rooms, temperature, humidity, light and noise levels should be maintained within limits compatible with the health and well being of both workers and animals. Manual handling is an integral part of animal house work so care is required to minimise the risk of muscoluskeletal injury. Written Standard Operating Procedures should include the demarcation and restrictions applying to different areas and animals as well as the routine procedures applicable to each. New workers and researchers should be supervised by animal care staff until they have demonstrated their ability to work with the animals without damage or stress to the animal itself and to themselves. Although zoonotic diseases are not common, the prevention, detection, and eradication of zoonotic diseases from the animal facility are a primary concern of the entire animal care staff. 

The use of restraint devices is sometimes necessary for the welfare of the animals and the safety of persons handling the animals. These include not eating, drinking, or applying cosmetics or contact lenses around animals or animal care areas, wearing gloves when handling animals or their tissues, taking care not to rub the face with contaminated hands or gloves, and hand washing after each animal contact. In the January 1998 publication by the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Preventing Asthma in Animal Handlers, several strategies for preventing exposure to animal allergens are discussed. Preventing exposure Animal handlers should take steps to protect themselves from exposure to animals and animal products. Performing animal manipulations within ventilated hoods or safety cabinets when possible. 

Installing ventilated animal cage racks or filter-top animal cages. In addition to worker safety, animal welfare is a paramount consideration in selecting the anaesthetic for each particular species of animal and each operation carried out. 

Keywords: [“Animal”,”work”,”handling”]
Source: http://www.safety.uwa.edu.au/topics/biological/animal

We Pigs News for 04-22-2018

How To Give a Guinea Pig a Health Check *Series*

Teddy Guinea Pig Facts

The Teddy guinea pig is an often sought after breed, mainly because of its distinct appearance and promising show qualities. The Teddy then began to be bred for competition and became recognized by the American Cavy Breeders Association in 1978. The Teddy’s distinguishable short, dense coat has been described as rough and wiry in comparison to guinea pigs like the American, which it will often get confused for, but their unique texture is still desirable among potential guinea pig owners, especially those looking to show their pigs in competition. You might use the texture of an Abyssinian to get an idea of how a Teddy feels, but there are significant differences in the breeds’ appearances. Teddy breed can be found in any of the common color patterns among the cavy species, including black, grey, and agouti patterns. 

Grooming a Teddy is much less tedious a job than, say, grooming a Peruvian or another long haired pig who needs to be brushed constantly to avoid fur tangles. Bathing your teddy could be entirely unnecessary if you’re attentive with grooming; but if your Teddy gets into extra mischief while playing outside, bathe him in warm water with a veterinarian recommended shampoo and blow dry him gently on low heat to avoid chills. A healthy guinea pig diet consists of hay, pellets, and fresh fruits and veggies, Teddies included. Many of their qualities have made them favorable contestants and breeders have noticed what they are, so if you are interested in taking your Teddy to show, pay attention to these details. Breeders have concluded that it is most common for a Teddy to reach the fluff stage around three to four weeks of age, but that the Teddies who succeed in shows are the ones who develop more slow and steadily, reaching the fluff stage at four to five weeks. 

Overall, judges are looking for a prime example of the Teddy breed. Whether looking for a pet for your child, a winning show piggy, or just a household companion, a Teddy guinea pig is a great option. 

Keywords: [“Teddy”,”breed”,”pig”]
Source: https://www.furrytips.com/teddy-guinea-pig

PTSD in the Slaughterhouse

The majority of these facilities slaughter and process animals, collectively employing thousands of workers who turn a constant stream of live creatures into an array of profitable by-products. A farm animal entering the front door will reach the exit about 19 minutes later. The emerging literature, including a study by the University of Windsor, on the psychological effects of slaughterhouse work on humans is startling. Rarely noted is the fact that the slaughterhouse is a site of unfathomable connectivity. The most intimate and bloodstained bond between humans and the animals we consume is forged between nearly voiceless slaughterhouse workers and the animals they’re employed to kill. 

Slaughterhouse employees are not only exposed to a battery of physical dangers on the cut floor, but the psychological weight of their work erodes their well being. As slaughterhouse workers are increasingly being treated for post-traumatic stress disorder, researchers are finally starting to systematically explore the results of killing sentient animals for a living. Amy Fitzgerald, a criminology professor at the University of Windsor in Canada, has found a strong correlation between the presence of a large slaughterhouse and high crime rates in U.S. communities. One might object that a slaughterhouse town’s disproportionate population of poor, working-class males might be the real cause, but Fitzgerald controlled for that possibility by comparing her data to counties with comparable populations employed in factory-like operations. 

Naturally, in food-conscious places such as Austin, there will be a conspicuous percentage of consumers who buy animal products sourced from small farms and think themselves absolved from all this messiness. Animal products these days are sold with a story: the animal was humanely raised, it was cage-free, it was free-ranged, it was pasture-fed, it’s hormone-free. Excluded from these stories is the fact that an animal was killed. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”slaughterhouse”,”work”]
Source: https://www.texasobserver.org/ptsd-in-the-slaughterhouse

Pigs given spinach genes in experiment

Pigs implanted with spinach genes have been created by scientists. The experiment, thought to be the world’s first to genetically engineer mammals to contain DNA from plants, is claimed to have produced pork that is healthier than that from normal pigs. To create the mutant animals, the experts removed spinach genes from plants and inserted them into fertilised pig eggs. These were then implanted into surrogate mother animals. Dr Iritani said meat from the pigs would be ‘more healthy’ than normal pork, although it was too early to say whether it could be considered as healthy as spinach – which was famously eaten by cartoon hero Popeye when he needed a surge of strength. 

No details of how the meat might be healthier were given by the scientists, but experts in the field suggested that the plant genes produced beneficial proteins in the animals’ flesh which were normally found in spinach leaves. Dr Vicky Robinson, a scientist at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said: ‘If people want to benefit from vegetables in their diet, they can just eat vegetables. A major report in Britain recently predicted that the first genetically modified farm animals will be on our plates within ten years. GM pork from pigs with cow genes – which help reduce the incidence of gastrointenstinal disease – is likely to be the first to make it to supermarket shelves in this country. Many experts argue that genetically tinkering with the make-up of animals for food is simply a more precise version of the selective breeding used by man for thousands of years. 

As well as having benefits for agriculture, experts insist that say genetically modifying animals may have other advantages. Dr Iritani, a leading animal geneticist who has predicted that advances in genetic science will allow him to resurrect the woolly mammoth within 20 years, appears to admit that consumers might not accept his Popeye pigs and that the technology might never be widely used. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”pig”,”scientist”]
Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-96707/Pigs-given-spinach-genes…

We Pigs News for 04-11-2018

Ninja Guinea Pig – Fortitude Valley Vet

Anti-viral components in soybean meal may promote growth and health in pigs

URBANA, Ill. – Swine diets are carefully formulated to provide the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fats. Feeding soybean meal as part of pig diets is nothing new. The ingredient may have been quietly promoting growth and health of pigs all along, but its effects may have been masked by the routine use of in-feed antibiotics. With the advent of the U.S. Veterinary Feed Directive, which mandates more judicious use of in-feed antibiotics, producers are wondering what alternatives are out there. 

Dilger and Brooke Smith, lead author of the article and graduate researcher in the Veterinary Medical Scholars Program at U of I, were invited by the board of the Journal of Animal Science to review the state of knowledge on soybean-derived isoflavones and saponins. In the article, Smith details the use of soy and its processed forms in swine diets, and reviews research from rodent, pig, and human studies on the cellular activity of isoflavones and saponins. The research shows soy isoflavones and saponins have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects on a cellular level. They also promote growth and help pigs return to health faster after PRRSV infection. The existing studies were either done in a laboratory or in a highly controlled setting over a short period, so it’s difficult to say what effect the compounds might have in a realistic production setting, with the stress of weaning, group housing, and other real-world factors. 

Smith is poised to launch a long-term study set in a full production context, to isolate the effects of isoflavones on pigs infected with the PRRS virus. Results are probably a year away, but Dilger and Smith are optimistic about the potential of soy-derived isoflavones and saponins as growth and health promoters in the industry. They suggest there could be a future in which pigs are fed a greater proportion of soybean meal or other specialized soy products at an earlier stage after weaning. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”isoflavones”,”saponins”]
Source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-03/uoic-aci032918.php

PTSD in the Slaughterhouse

The majority of these facilities slaughter and process animals, collectively employing thousands of workers who turn a constant stream of live creatures into an array of profitable by-products. A farm animal entering the front door will reach the exit about 19 minutes later. The emerging literature, including a study by the University of Windsor, on the psychological effects of slaughterhouse work on humans is startling. Rarely noted is the fact that the slaughterhouse is a site of unfathomable connectivity. The most intimate and bloodstained bond between humans and the animals we consume is forged between nearly voiceless slaughterhouse workers and the animals they’re employed to kill. 

Slaughterhouse employees are not only exposed to a battery of physical dangers on the cut floor, but the psychological weight of their work erodes their well being. As slaughterhouse workers are increasingly being treated for post-traumatic stress disorder, researchers are finally starting to systematically explore the results of killing sentient animals for a living. Amy Fitzgerald, a criminology professor at the University of Windsor in Canada, has found a strong correlation between the presence of a large slaughterhouse and high crime rates in U.S. communities. One might object that a slaughterhouse town’s disproportionate population of poor, working-class males might be the real cause, but Fitzgerald controlled for that possibility by comparing her data to counties with comparable populations employed in factory-like operations. 

Naturally, in food-conscious places such as Austin, there will be a conspicuous percentage of consumers who buy animal products sourced from small farms and think themselves absolved from all this messiness. Animal products these days are sold with a story: the animal was humanely raised, it was cage-free, it was free-ranged, it was pasture-fed, it’s hormone-free. Excluded from these stories is the fact that an animal was killed. 

Keywords: [“animal”,”slaughterhouse”,”work”]
Source: https://www.texasobserver.org/ptsd-in

Anti-viral Components in Soybean Meal May Promote Growth and Health in Pigs

Swine diets are carefully formulated to provide the perfect balance of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fats. Feeding soybean meal as part of pig diets is nothing new. The ingredient may have been quietly promoting growth and health of pigs all along, but its effects may have been masked by the routine use of in-feed antibiotics. With the advent of the U.S. Veterinary Feed Directive, which mandates more judicious use of in-feed antibiotics, producers are wondering what alternatives are out there. 

Dilger and Brooke Smith, lead author of the article and graduate researcher in the Veterinary Medical Scholars Program at U of I, were invited by the board of the Journal of Animal Science to review the state of knowledge on soybean-derived isoflavones and saponins. In the article, Smith details the use of soy and its processed forms in swine diets, and reviews research from rodent, pig, and human studies on the cellular activity of isoflavones and saponins. The research shows soy isoflavones and saponins have anti-viral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects on a cellular level. They also promote growth and help pigs return to health faster after PRRSV infection. The existing studies were either done in a laboratory or in a highly controlled setting over a short period, so it’s difficult to say what effect the compounds might have in a realistic production setting, with the stress of weaning, group housing, and other real-world factors. 

Smith is poised to launch a long-term study set in a full production context, to isolate the effects of isoflavones on pigs infected with the PRRS virus. Results are probably a year away, but Dilger and Smith are optimistic about the potential of soy-derived isoflavones and saponins as growth and health promoters in the industry. They suggest there could be a future in which pigs are fed a greater proportion of soybean meal or other specialized soy products at an earlier stage after weaning. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”isoflavones”,”saponins”]
Source: https://www.goldeaglecoop.com/news/anti-viral-components-in…

We Pigs News for 03-24-2018

Guinea Pigs May Be Giving People Salmonella, the CDC Says

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday issued an icky warning about pet guinea pigs: they may be spreading salmonella. The CDC has identified nine people who became sick due to a strain of salmonella bacteria that can likely be traced back to contact with pet guinea pigs, according to a report from the agency. The cases affect residents of eight different states and were reported between July 2015 and December 2017. One person was hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported. Salmonella is a serious bacterial infection that results in gastrointestinal distress and can develop into a life-threatening condition if infection spreads beyond the intestines, according to the CDC. It is typically contracted by eating contaminated food or water, but rodents can also carry and transmit strains of the bacteria, even when they’re kept as domesticated pets. Of seven patients interviewed by the CDC, four said they had been in contact with pet guinea pigs in the week before showing symptoms. Genome sequencing also showed that the strain responsible for the outbreak was similar to bacteria collected from a guinea pig belonging to one of the sick people, pointing to a link between the animals and the disease’s spread. While the last case in the outbreak was reported in December, the CDC reminds guinea pig owners to wash their hands after any contact with the pets or their habitats, to avoid playing with the rodents in a manner that could cause bites and to clean pet cages and supplies outside, if possible. Families with children younger than five, pregnant women and elderly adults also shouldn’t have pet rodents because of the risk of infection, according to the report. Guinea pigs are only the latest probable source of a salmonella outbreak. In the past few months, the herbal supplement kratom, chicken salad and dog food have all been blamed for spreading the infection.

Keywords: [“pet”,”guinea”,”pig”]
Source: http://time.com/5188526/guinea-pigs-salmonella

Agriculture: livestock

Proper handling facilities, which you keep in good working order; a race and a crush suitable for the animals you handle; trained and competent workers; and. The risk is greater if the animals have not been handled frequently, such as those from hills or moorland, sucklers or newly calved cattle. Cattle – the race Animals should be able to readily enter the race, which should have a funnel end. A circular collecting pen means workers can stand safely behind a forcing gate as they move animals into the race, and keep the animals moving. Animals need to see clearly to the crush and beyond, so that they will readily move along the race. Sheet the sides of the race to help keep cattle moving by reducing visual disturbances such as shadows and other animals. Never work on an animal in the crush with an unsecured animal waiting in the race behind. Additional head restraint will prevent the animal tossing its head up and injuring people; have a rump rail, chain or bar to minimise forward and backward movement of the animal. Never use sticks and prods to strike an animal – this may breach welfare legislation as well as agitating the animal. Before beginning work on any animal, check that you can restrain it from kicking. Use well-drained pasture, avoiding muddy drinking and feeding areas; house dirty animals on clean straw for a few days before slaughter; for court-housed animals, provide adequate drainage and bed them down regularly; for animals on slats, make sure the stocking rate is right as too many or too few animals in the yard will lead to greater soiling; change the animal’s diet for a short while before despatch to avoid feeds that cause loose motions, such as brassica, or spring grass ; use good husbandry practices, such as pasture rotation or appropriate use of anthelmintics, to prevent diarrhoea. Pigs – Make full use of pig boards when moving or working among animals.

Keywords: [“animal”,”work”,”race”]
Source: http://www.hse.gov.uk/agriculture/topics/livestock.htm

Tips and advice on the health of your guinea pig

It is full of tips and advice on caring for guinea pigs – read on! Guinea pigs should not be kept with rabbits as rabbits can pass on diseases to guinea pigs. Their digestive system requires lots of grass or hay as guinea pig food in order to function properly. Guinea pigs also require vitamin C in their diet as their bodies are unable to make it, they can get this from grass and leafy greens such as kale and broccoli or grass based commercial guinea pig pellets. Guinea pigs’ teeth grow continuously throughout their life and need to be worn down and kept at the correct length and shape by eating grass, hay and leafy green plants. This procedure requires the guinea pig to come into the vets for a day and normally they can go home the same evening. This can be passed onto people so if you suspect your guinea pig may be suffering from ringworm please take them to see a vet and make sure you wash your hands well after handling. These can occur because the guinea pigs teeth grow continually and if teeth are not being worm down by grass/hay they can develop small spurs on the teeth with can cause discomfort, pain and damage to the tongue and cheek. If you notice that your guinea pig is not eating normally or if you would like your pets teeth checked please take them to see a vet. A good diet, a clean environment, regular handling and prompt veterinary attention are the mainstays of good guinea pig care. If you have any concerns about your guinea pig, or just a question regarding their care, always call 01323 640011, or use the contact form on this website. This guinea pig health guide, full of tips and advice on the ideal care of guinea pigs, is provided by St. Anne’s veterinary group which serves the pets and owners of East Sussex through it’s surgeries in Eastbourne, Langney, Willingdon and East Dean and at their homes with the ‘My Visiting Vet’ service.

Keywords: [“Guinea”,”pig”,”care”]
Source: https://stannesvets.co.uk/guinea-pig-health-tips-advice.html.html

We Pigs News for 03-09-2018

Occupational Health & Safety: Guinea Pigs

Guinea pigs are docile rodents that rarely, if ever, inflict injuries. There are no significant zoonotic diseases associated with guinea pigs. The major disease potential of guinea pigs is allergy. Many individuals working with guinea pigs develop serious symptoms related to allergic responses. Strict attention should be paid to the protective clothing recommendations discussed below. RECOMMENDED PREVENTIVE MEASURES. Whenever possible, assign work involving direct animal contact to personnel without pre-existing allergies or respiratory conditions; Dust masks, gloves and long sleeved apparel should be worn at all times when working with guinea pigs; whenever there is a risk of aerosol transmission of an infectious agent, approved respirator masks should be worn instead of dust masks; Wash hands after handling animals; When seeking medical advice for any illness, inform your physician that you work with guinea pigs. Perform procedures in a laminar flow hood whenever possible; Do not wear protective clothing such as lab coats outside of animal areas and laboratories; Keep transport carriers out of labs/offices/public areas; Use disposable supplies whenever possible; Sanitize lab/surgical areas after animal work. Wash any injured site with soap and water for at least 15 minutes; Control bleeding by applying direct pressure with a sterile gauze or bandage; Cover wound with clean bandage; Seek advice from emergency room physician. ALLERGIES. Allergies to guinea pigs are common. Exposure to guinea pigs has frequently been associated with occupational asthma. About 10% of allergen activity is found on particles small enough to penetrate into the lower respiratory tract. Guinea pig urine appears to be the major source of allergen. Other allergenic components are found in dander, fur and saliva.

Keywords: [“Guinea”,”pig”,”work”]
Source: http://www.iacuc.ucsf.edu/Safe/awOhsGuineaPig.asp

Easy checks for a healthy guinea pig

Thankfully, guinea pigs are very hardy creatures, and if kept clean and fed well they rarely become sick. There are some daily checks you should make, to ensure that your guinea pig stays well, it also helps you to notice any change very quickly, and visit your vet at the first sign of illness. EyesThe eyes should be clear and bright, with no sign of cloudiness or discharge. An eye that suddenly goes cloudy may mean that the guinea pig has got an ulcer as a result of a piece of hay in its eye. Any eye problems require urgent veterinary attention. Guinea pigs do normally secrete a milky discharge from their eyes, which precedes grooming, as they use it on their paws to groom themselves, if you see this you do not need to worry about it. NoseThe nose should be clean, and as with the eyes, shouldn’t be runny. Any discharge or sneezing may suggest that your guinea pig has a cold. Any patches of hair loss or areas where the skin is red and sore may suggest that your guinea pig has mites. Watch him closely, is he scratching more than usual? Mites burrow under the skin and cause a distressing condition called mange, and the sooner you spot any problem, the sooner you can get it treated, something your guinea pig will certainly thank you for. Sometimes you may see little tiny nits walking on your guinea pigs fur, these are hay mites, which are harmless and a simple shampoo will get rid of them for you. Guinea pigs have no fur on the bottom of their feet, so check the bottom of their feet regularly for any sign of soreness. If their feet are sore their bedding wants to be as soft as possible, wood shavings and soft meadow hay is best. The bottomYes, this bit needs checking too… The whole area should be clean and dry. If the guinea pig is wet and smelly between its legs it may have a urine infection.

Keywords: [“guinea”,”pig”,”any”]
Source: https://www.omlet.com.au/guide/guinea_pigs/guinea_pig_health/health_checks

We Pigs News for 02-15-2018

CT IRegs Animal Exports Home

International health certificates for the export of animals from the United States are completed by the accredited veterinarian who certifies herd and animal health status, conducts tests, and records test results for the individual animals being exported. Completed and signed international health certificates for the export of animals from the United States must be endorsed by a Veterinary Services area office in order to be valid. The United States has minimal requirements for animals to be exported to other countries. Your Area Veterinarian-in-Charge can provide you with the current regulations, tests, and inspections required. Approved ports of embarkation and shipping requirements can be found in Program handbook. Each country may have other specific health requirements for entry of animals. These requirements are established by the importing country, not the United States. Other countries may also have their own certificate format for export. Since export requirements frequently change, obtain the current export requirements from the Veterinary Service office in your area before each shipment. Do not rely solely on information provided by brokers and exporters. Export certificates are official documents and they should be typewritten, accurate, and complete. If you have any questions or concerns regarding these regulations for exporting animals or animal products to a foreign country, you should contact the Veterinary Services service center in the State from which the animals or products will be exported. Notice: If you have any questions or concerns regarding the procedures and requirements for exporting animals, animal products, or to obtain a zoosanitary certificate for an animal product, you should contact the Veterinary Services service center covering the area from where the product will be exported.

Keywords: [“export”,”animal”,”requirements”]
Source: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals/downloads/…

Occupational Health & Safety: Guinea Pigs

Guinea pigs are docile rodents that rarely, if ever, inflict injuries. There are no significant zoonotic diseases associated with guinea pigs. The major disease potential of guinea pigs is allergy. Many individuals working with guinea pigs develop serious symptoms related to allergic responses. Strict attention should be paid to the protective clothing recommendations discussed below. RECOMMENDED PREVENTIVE MEASURES. Whenever possible, assign work involving direct animal contact to personnel without pre-existing allergies or respiratory conditions; Dust masks, gloves and long sleeved apparel should be worn at all times when working with guinea pigs; whenever there is a risk of aerosol transmission of an infectious agent, approved respirator masks should be worn instead of dust masks; Wash hands after handling animals; When seeking medical advice for any illness, inform your physician that you work with guinea pigs. Perform procedures in a laminar flow hood whenever possible; Do not wear protective clothing such as lab coats outside of animal areas and laboratories; Keep transport carriers out of labs/offices/public areas; Use disposable supplies whenever possible; Sanitize lab/surgical areas after animal work. Wash any injured site with soap and water for at least 15 minutes; Control bleeding by applying direct pressure with a sterile gauze or bandage; Cover wound with clean bandage; Seek advice from emergency room physician. ALLERGIES. Allergies to guinea pigs are common. Exposure to guinea pigs has frequently been associated with occupational asthma. About 10% of allergen activity is found on particles small enough to penetrate into the lower respiratory tract. Guinea pig urine appears to be the major source of allergen. Other allergenic components are found in dander, fur and saliva.

Keywords: [“Guinea”,”pig”,”work”]
Source: http://www.iacuc.ucsf.edu/Safe/awOhsGuineaPig.asp

CRISPR Scientists Created Low-Fat Pigs by Editing Their Genes

Raising pigs for food is a tricky business-mostly because of their fat, the part that makes bacon so tasty. You can’t plump them up too much, because overly fat pigs are more expensive to raise. Since they’re not as efficient at burning body fat, they require more energy-in the form of heated pens and barns-to keep them warm. Too-skinny pigs aren’t able to regulate their body temperature properly and tend to die when temperatures drop. Farmers have to find a way to keep their pigs healthy but plump enough to produce meat. Now, in a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers in China report that they have created healthy pigs with much less body fat. Using the gene editing tool CRISPR, which can precisely edit DNA, the scientists inserted a gene that helps pigs to burn fat to stay warm. It turns out that pigs don’t have this gene, which other mammals, including mice and rats, use to regulate their body temperature. The Chinese research team inserted a mouse version of the gene into embryonic pig cells, then coaxed those cells to generate more than 2,000 pig embryo clones that were genetically identical to each other. Female pig surrogates gestated the embryos, and 12 male piglets were born with the new gene. The genetically modified pigs contained about 24% less body fat than pigs without the gene. If the results are replicated, the pigs may represent new agricultural potential: leaner pigs that don’t get cold, don’t cost as much to raise and make potentially healthier, lower-fat bacon. Don’t expect these pigs to fly in the U.S. anytime soon. The safety of CRISPR hasn’t been completely proven yet, either; some researchers point out that as precise as CRISPR is, it’s still not perfect. For now the pigs are proof that it’s possible to make lower fat pork.

Keywords: [“pig”,”fat”,”gene”]
Source: http://time.com/4995237/crispr-gene-editing-pigs-fat

We Pigs News for 01-10-2018

Guinea Pig Nutrition/diet – Happy Health Guinea Pig

The aim is to make your farm a safe, healthy and legal place of work for employers, employees and others who may be affected by what you do. These may include: Workplace transport Machinery and equipment Preventing falls and working at height Child and public safety Health problems in agriculture including manual handling, dust and noise Using chemicals, pesticides and veterinary medicines safely Personal protective equipment. These types of injuries can be reduced by: Making sure staff have received training or instruction in safe and efficient handling techniques Keep a visual check of the animal and avoid facing away from it Design and layout of buildings and facilities Handling Pigs Ensure a clear escape route when in a pen with a boar or sow with a litter or a sow in close proximity to another sow and litter Ensure the sow is properly restrained or segregated when working with her piglets Make full use of pig boards when moving or working among animals. If not, then you need to try and organise the site so that the risk of contact is minimised Do not lift anything above tractor or loader height when working within a 10m horizontal distance of OHPLs Know the full height of equipment and machinery when all parts are raised to their full extent. Check these heights against the line clearance distances marked on the farm map so that you know where the particular areas of risk are If you have no other option but to move equipment close to OHPLs, then you must contact your electricity supplier and temporarily disconnect them If high machines frequently work near OHPLs, eg in the farmyard, consult your local electricity company about burying or diverting the lines Electricity and Overhead Power Lines Sign areas of risk from all approaches, look at physical barriers, ie roped area, to prevent machinery access to cables or highlight the restricted areas of access on concrete if possible. Consider wide wheel settings for work on slopes Plan the operation in advance and make sure operators know the key elements of safe working on slopes. Key areas to remember: You should always turn uphill when working across a slope and descend straight down the gentlest gradient You cannot always safely descend a slope that you safely drove up Tractor rear wheel grip lessens as the load of a rear-mounted machine is emptied Tractors with trailed rollers, four-wheel trailers etc will have extra thrust imposed with no additional weight – they may slide away out of control Only carry the number of passengers a vehicle is equipped to transport. No entry should be made into a hopper either above or below any bridged meal If entry into a hopper is unavoidable, then you need to develop a safe system of work that has to be followed. Pdf Worker Welfare Lone working is an inevitable part of farming it is the employer’s duty to keep their employees safe while at work. Pdf The pig industry is also faced with the challenge of employing migrant workers, whose first language is not English. So even short term exposure can be harmful, particularly if workers are exposed to other sources of noise during the day. Control measures to reduce exposure to harmful levels of noise can include: The use of mechanical or automated feeding systems to reduce the need to enter the building when it is at its noisiest, eg at feeding time Making sure any work that needs to be done inside the building is carried out when the animals are quiet Fitting any controls for the feeding system away from the noise or in a protected area, eg a noise proof enclosure or using ear defenders. Veterinary Medicines Work with veterinary medicines should only be undertaken by competent staff who have received adequate instruction, information and training. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions and wear any personal protective equipment necessary, eg gloves, aprons, face shield etc Dispose of used needles safely, eg in a purpose made sharps box Store VMs safely in a suitable locked cupboard or other secure place where they cannot be accessed by children Observe any precautions or special instructions, eg certain products are not to be used by pregnant workers Everyone who works with veterinary medicines should make sure that high standards of personal hygiene are observed Anyone who feels unwell after the use of a VM should seek medical advice as soon as possible. The solutions to many manual handling tasks usually involve a combination of physical measures, systems of work and worker training.

Keywords: [“work”,”handled”,”pig”]
Source: http://pork.ahdb.org.uk/media/2204/health_and_safety_for_pig_keepers.pdf

Cost of a Guinea Pig

Typical costs:Guinea pigs with short hair in white, black and cream, or those with non-distinct markings run $10-$33.Guinear pigs with strong multi-colored patterns in black and white, gold and white cost around $29. Long and curly-haired Peruvian or Himalayan pigs run about $30-$35.Related articles: Hamster, Rabbit, Ferret Additional costs:Cages cost $35-$80. Some pet stores offer guinea pig starter kits which include a small cage, a month’s supply of food, a water bottle, a bowl and bedding for around $45. 10-gallon aquariums run $20, but don’t offer the same amount of ventilation as a wire cage. Guinea pig food costs around $5 for a 5-pound bag, or about $5-$10 per month depending on the size and appetite of the guinea pig. Harnesses used to take guinea pigs for a walk or to play in the yard run $5-$7.Exercise balls are priced $14-$17.Common Veterinary costs include spay or neutering for around $45. The Humane Society offers care and handling tips for guinea pigs. Shopping for a guinea pig:Petfinder.com offers a listing by zip code of rescued guinea pigs looking for a home. WTF?!No don’t put a bledy guinea pig in an excersise ball!my first Piggie died of a broken spine when my very ignorant cousin put him in a ball :(Starter kits…No!The cages are way too tiny and everything is plastic and crap and will last U about 2 months!!Don’t trust the food on there-they look all fun and colourful but that’s all artificial stuff!if that isn’t the food in it then its always cheap muesli type feed which WILL cause feeding and fuss broblems. 3 months worth of food,hay,bedding,and vitanin c tablets(its good for your guinea pig if you put a special vitamin c tablet in their food every day since guinea pigs don’t get enough)2. I bought a guinea pig from a spca shelter and it was not healthy at the time I purchased it they told me it was healthy and they gave me a free vetinarie vouchor to have her check up see if she is healthy every one told me she was healthy and now she died on me she was only 61/2 years old now I took her to the vetand they told me she has ashe had a gas bubble and then the vet also to me she had a block on the guineapig kidney or may be a stone in the kidney the vet relly did not know what to do for her and the vet was a specialist in guinea pig and gave me some medicine but the guinea pig didn t want to eat it and then she stopped eating all to gether and died three days later and now I am in remorse of my little babe guinea pig. I have no idea what I should do there is so much info about guinea pigs that I researched all last week but the cost is so high that I don’t think I will be able to afford it and I am kind of wary of the ads because the guinea pig could be sick in some way or something this is so hard I have never had a guinea pig before and I am an only child so it would be good for me to have a good pet. I got a guinea pig from someone for 10 dollars instead of the pet store. Posted by: me.net in Marriottsville, MD.Posted: September 26th, 2010 12:09PM. Do NOT EVER EVER EVER put a guinea pig in and aquarium or a ball. We paid $20 for our male guinea pig from an independent pet store. We got the cage/starter kit at Petsmart for around $35. I get a big bale of natural wood shavings a couple times a year for $6. The bag of guinea pig food I get at Wal Mart costs $3 and lasts him quite awhile. Yearly amounts for guinea pig pellets, hay, veggies and pine bedding run me about $550 for two pigs. Vet visits, on a good year, is $0. An average year runs over $200 per pig, and in a bad year, tops over $1000 per pig. Exercise balls should never be used by a guinea pig.

Keywords: [“pig”,”Guinea”,”cage”]
Source: http://pets.costhelper.com/guinea-pig.html