We Pigs News for 10-09-2018

Morning Routine For 9 Guinea Pigs

Within the last few months, nicotine vaping products became legal in Canada. As e-cigarettes and the promotion of vaping products become more prevalent, health professionals are warning they are not as safe as many believe. Within the last few months, nicotine vaping products became legal in Canada and last week, the provincial government released proposed changes to legislation on vaping products in convenience stores, which would allow companies to display and advertise their products – something that’s banned in seven other provinces. E-cigarette and other vaping devices heat liquid into an inhalable vapor that often contains nicotine. Still, many experts believe vaping is less harmful than cigarettes, but there are some significant health concerns they believe consumers should be aware of. 

Abou-Jaoude said his e-juices are generally made of vegetable glycerin, artificial flavours, nicotine and propylene glycol, a common food additive and flavouring. Nicotine in many e-cigarettes creates many of the same oral health problems as regular cigarettes, according to Glogauer. The amount of nicotine in a particular e-juice can vary, but Glogauer said there are also harmful chemicals in e-juice smoke not present in cigarette smoke. Health Canada said it is reviewing data and testing vaping liquids. Still, many experts believe those who cannot quit smoking should use vaping as an alternative. 

Health Canada agrees vaping is a less harmful source of nicotine than smoking. Abou-Jaoude says he’s using vaping as a way to curb his smoking habit and believes consumers should educate themselves about vaping products and use them when needed. 

Keywords: [“vape”,”nicotine”,”product”]
Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/vaping-health-risks-1.4850823

Regina Humane Society Inc

Guinea pigs make excellent pets for adults and children. There are three breeds of guinea pigs that are normally kept as pets. Younger guinea pigs are easy to train and take a little less time to acclimatize, while older ones may take a little longer to get used to a new surrounding, but may already be socialized. Guinea pigs do not require yearly vaccinations, but they should have annual check-ups for illnesses or diseases. These little critters can also be trained to use a litter box inside the cage by placing it in the guinea pig’s selected washroom area. 

Cavies do not require a huge cage, but the larger the cage, the less cleaning, and more exercise and entertainment for the guinea pig. Standard size cages are available from pet stores, but most of these are suitable for only one guinea pig. Corn cob bedding can be used, but is not ideal, as some guinea pigs will eat the bedding, and the corn cob pellets mold very quickly. Make sure the cage is placed in a bright, draft free room, at room temperature, 18-23 degrees C. Also, the cage should not be placed in direct sunlight, or too close to a radiator, where the guinea pig may develop heat exhaustion. 

Pelleted food is available and the cavy should be given 1/8 cup per day for a 2lb. guinea pig. Rabbit pellets should not be used, because they do not contain vitamin C and they may contain excessive amounts of vitamin D, which is toxic to guinea pigs. During the bath, support the guinea pig gently with one hand to prevent the cavy from jumping out of the bowl or slipping and injuring itself. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”Guinea”,”cage”]
Source: https://reginahumanesociety.ca/programs-services/pet-care/small-animal-care/guinea-pig-care/

What are the common health problems in pet guinea pigs?

Many of the common health problems seen in pet guinea pigs are often preventable by good husbandry and good feeding practices. Vitamin C deficiencyLike humans, guinea pigs cannot synthesise vitamin C from other food substances so they require a direct dietary source of vitamin C. This is usually supplied sufficiently by feeding fresh leafy green vegetables. Affected guinea pigs may be anorexic, lethargic, weak; move with difficulty and appear painful when moving. Vitamin C deficiency causes the guinea pig severe pain and discomfort and is a preventable condition. 

Ulcerative pododermatitisIn the wild, guinea pigs generally live on grassed areas or other types of natural material which provide some measure of cushioning for their feet. Swollen and ulcerated footpads are a common problem when guinea pigs are kept on hard surfaces and/or uncovered wire mesh floors. Domesticated guinea pigs should be kept on soft floor material and soft bedding material to help prevent ulcerative pododermatitis. Dental problemsGuinea pigs fed an inappropriate diet are highly susceptible to dental problems. Dental disease causes severe pain and discomfort to the guinea pig and is best prevented by feeding an appropriate diet. 

Guinea pigs have evolved over thousands of years to eat a high fibre diet. In their natural environment wild guinea pigs eat predominantly grass throughout the day. If you suspect your guinea pig is suffering from any of the above mentioned diseases and/or you notice any other abnormalities or problems please consult your vet immediately. 

Keywords: [“pig”,”guinea”,”Vitamin”]
Source: https://kb.rspca.org.au/what-are-the-common-health-problems-in-pet-guinea-pigs_294.html

Billy Connolly health: Comedian volunteers to be a “guinea pig” for Parkinsons disease

The 75-year-old comedian was hit with a double blow after he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and prostate cancer in the same week five years ago. The actor also revealed the disease now dominates his life. The comic added Parkinson’s disease is the first thing he thinks about everyday. Sir Billy had successful surgery to remove his prostate following the cancer diagnosis. The actor and comedian is gearing up to star in two new television documentaries and also plans to have his book released later this year. 

He will appear in a new BBC series called Coming Home in which he returns to his roots in Scotland and does a tour around the country. The theme of the show centres around the comedian’s memories, with his travels being sparked by different parts of his life such as the Hank Williams album and a bottle of air recreating the smell of the old Glasgow Docks. Billy will also appear in a new ITV documentary called Billy Connolly’s Ultimate World Tour which sees him reflect on 25 years of travelling the world. The knighted star will take camera crews around his home in Florida after he was advised by doctors to move to a warmer climate. Earlier this year, Sir Billy and his wife hit back at claims by Sir Michael Parkinson that he was unable to recognise the presenter due to his health battle. 

Sir Billy was a regular guest on Sir Michael’s self-titled show which ran from 1971 to 2007.. 

Keywords: [“Billy”,”Sir”,”Parkinson”]
Source: https://www.express.co.uk/celebrity-news/1028403/billy-connolly-health-update-parkinson-disease-research-trial-latest-news

We Pigs News for 08-06-2018

5 Simple Health Checks for Your Guinea Pig | MediCavy Monday

Sex Makes Naked Mole Rats Live Longer

In colonies of naked mole rats-wrinkly, pink-skinned rodents with oversized front teeth that live in extensive underground tunnel systems-one special couple gets to reproduce, creating the entire next generation for the colony. For naked mole rats, procreating appears to slow aging, the exact opposite of what’s normally seen. In a new study, researchers pin down the genetic alterations that give breeding naked mole rats such long lifespans to attempt to explain how it happens. Most naked mole rats are workers charged with finding food, defending the colony and taking care of the breeding pair’s young. If a naked mole rat establishes a new colony for example, that individual will undergo a series of changes written into their genomes to become a breeder. 

Martin Bens, an aging researcher at the Leibniz Institute on Aging in Jena, Germany, who led the new research, knew naked mole rat breeders lived longer than non-breeding, worker rats, but he wanted to figure out why. They took stock of how gene expression differed between a breeding pair and the rest of the naked mole rat colony. When the team analyzed the rodents’ gene expression in 10 tissues central to aging, sexual reproduction and status, they found the genes that made naked mole rats different from guinea pigs were also the genes that differentiated breeding pairs from worker rats. Genes the formation of ATP seem be upregulated in naked mole rats, while other genes related to the immune system and the ability to metabolize fats-processes associated with aging-were turned down in naked mole rats but ratcheted up in guinea pigs, the team reports Thursday in BMC Biology. In a study published back-to-back with Bens’ research, Alessandro Ori, a group leader at the Leibniz Institute on Aging, has begun to address that question by examining liver proteins in young and old naked mole rats compared to guinea pigs. 

In that work, Ori and team found the livers of elderly naked mole rat livers are unique. The same molecular networks affected by aging in the naked mole rats are found in humans hinting at insights into our own longevity. 

Keywords: [“rat”,”mole”,”naked”]
Source: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2018/08/02/naked-mole-rat…

‘I cheated death and joined the Guinea Pig Club’

When Flying Officer Desmond O’Connell’s bomber plane was sent on a mission to sink the Bismarck in 1941 only to crash into a hill in flames, the 21-year-old was so badly burned his colleagues contacted his mother to make arrangements for his funeral. An observer in the back of the plane, Des, as he is known, was the last of the crew to crawl out through the cracked fuselage and was doused in petrol. The grass outside was alight and he went up in flames, burned all over but for the areas covered by his US-issue flying jacket and boots. Des was lucky enough to find his way to Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, under the care of the pioneering plastic surgeon Sir Archibald McIndoe. There, he underwent more than two years of painful experimental surgery. 

Sir Archibald, realising how the badly burnt and disfigured men on his wards were struggling to adapt to everyday life, decided to give their morale a boost. Formed in June 1941 with just 39 members, by the end of the war they numbered 649. Primarily a drinking club, with social events and trips into the town, the group formed close bonds for life, while Sir Archibald developed plastic surgery techniques some of which are still in use today. Today, only 17 members of the Guinea Pig Club survive in the UK, their numbers dwindling as the men enter their mid-90s. A commemorative monument is being unveiled by the Duke of Edinburgh at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire, recognising the work of Sir Archibald, who died in 1960, and the bravery of his Guinea Pigs. 

Photographs of men being treated during World War Two feature these tubes, often connecting their noses with skin on their torso or arms. Modern developments including microsurgery, in which the blood vessels of a skin graft can be reattached at the new site, eliminated the need for this type of procedure. Sir Archibald’s legacy has endured, not least at the Queen Victoria Hospital, now the leading burns and reconstructive surgery centre in the south-east of England. 

Keywords: [“Archibald”,”Sir”,”surgery”]
Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-37840480

UTMB researchers successfully transplant bioengineered lung

GALVESTON, Texas – A research team at the University of Texas Medical Branch have bioengineered lungs and transplanted them into adult pigs with no medical complication. In 2014, Joan Nichols and Joaquin Cortiella from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston were the first research team to successfully bioengineer human lungs in a lab. A support scaffold was created using a lung from an unrelated animal that was treated using a special mixture of sugar and detergent to eliminate all cells and blood in the lung, leaving only the scaffolding proteins or skeleton of the lung behind. The cells used to produce each bioengineered lung came from a single lung removed from each of the study animals. The lung scaffold was placed into a tank filled with a carefully blended cocktail of nutrients and the animals’ own cells were added to the scaffold following a carefully designed protocol or recipe. 

The bioengineered lungs were grown in a bioreactor for 30 days prior to transplantation. Animal recipients were survived for 10 hours, two weeks, one month and two months after transplantation, allowing the research team to examine development of the lung tissue following transplantation and how the bioengineered lung would integrate with the body. All of the pigs that received a bioengineered lung stayed healthy. As early as two weeks post-transplant, the bioengineered lung had established the strong network of blood vessels needed for the lung to survive. Nichols said that the focus of the study was to learn how well the bioengineered lung adapted and continued to mature within a large, living body. 

They didn’t evaluate how much the bioengineered lung provided oxygenation to the animal. The researchers said that with enough funding, they could grow lungs to transplant into people in compassionate use circumstances within five to 10 years. 

Keywords: [“lung”,”bioengineer”,”animal”]
Source: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-08/uotm-urs072718.php

We Pigs News for 04-22-2018

Guinea Pig Care : Guinea Pig Varieties

Hubbard Life

Two very exciting news stories to share regarding Kinetic Performance Dog Food, which is distributed by Hubbard Life! In November of 2015, the tireless efforts of Hubbard’s Bob Roth and Kinetic’s Dave Dourson finally paid off and resulted in the establishment of a new relationship with Vohne Liche Kennels in Denver, Indiana. Vohne Liche is a full service Working K-9 kennel representing the very best in highly trained police and military service dogs both in the United States and abroad. Founded in 1993 by United States Air Force Senior Master Sergeant Kenneth Licklider, Vohne Liche Kennels is simply the best in the industry in training K-9 Teams for protection duty anywhere in the world. Vohne Liche trained K-9 Teams can be found working at any number of local, state and federal agencies including the Pentagon, NSA, DoD, US State Department, US Army and over 500 other US government, police, military and civilian agencies. 

These guys are the best of the best and we welcome them to the Kinetic team. In February of 2016, Kinetic officially introduced Team Kinetic, a group of dedicated dog professionals who work to build and support Kinetic. Made up of Team Staff and Pro Staff levels, Team Kinetic is a group of industry influencers who serve as advocates for the Kinetic brand in their respective performance areas. Current Team Kinetic members represent professional breeders, trainers and competitors in the areas of hunting dogs, mushing dogs and police and military protection dogs. Most current members have been feeding the brand for years and were already working in some unofficial capacity to spread the Kinetic story. 

There are also plans to further expand Team Kinetic in the future. While the intent is to maintain a small core group of dedicated members, future plans for Team Kinetic include adding key professionals in other geographies as well as additional performance areas. To learn more about Team Kinetic members and their training and competitive methods, you can view their bios on the Kinetic website. 

Keywords: [“Kinetic”,”team”,”trained”]
Source: http://www.hubbardlife.com/blog/Guinea Pig.aspx

Transplanting Islets From Pigs to Humans

Xenotransplantation is the transplantation of tissue or organs from one species to another, for example, the transplanting of pig cells into humans. One type of xenotransplantation involves transplanting islets from pigs into humans in an attempt to cure type 1 diabetes. Several research teams throughout the world are conducting animal trials to determine whether pig islets can be transplanted without initiating hyper acute rejection, which is seen as one of the biggest obstacles to success in using pig cells in humans. One team is jumping ahead of the pack, initiating tests with humans by implanting encapsulated piglet islets into adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In May 2001, Rafael Valdes, MD, FACS, and colleagues from the Children’s Hospital of Mexico in Mexico City took islets from customized, disease-free, one-week-old piglets that had been bred specifically for xenotransplantation research purposes. 

The islets were transplanted into insulin-using adolescents ages 11 to 17 who had had type 1 diabetes for at least three years. Dr. Valdes employed a special method of inserting the pig islets. Two months later, after a collagen membrane had formed around the capsule, the cylinder was removed and approximately one million pig islets were injected into the tube. The pig islets were mixed with sertoli cells-cells of the testes, which nourish and protect developing sperm cells-to keep the immune system from attacking the pig islets. 

In August 2002, at the meeting of the Nineteenth International Congress of the Transplantation Society in Miami, Florida, David White, FRCPath, PhD, professor of xenotransplantation at Roberts Research Institute in London, Ontario, reported on the progress of the 12 children who received the pig islets. With pig islet transplantation, in particular, scientists fear transmitting a disease unique to pigs, called porcine endogenous retrovirus. Diatranz Ltd., of Auckland, New Zealand, harvested the pig islets used by Dr. Rafael Valdes in his Mexico City research. 

Keywords: [“islet”,”pig”,”Xenotransplantation”]
Source: https://www.diabeteshealth.com/transplanting-islets-from-pigs-to…

‘I cheated death and joined the Guinea Pig Club’

When Flying Officer Desmond O’Connell’s bomber plane was sent on a mission to sink the Bismarck in 1941 only to crash into a hill in flames, the 21-year-old was so badly burned his colleagues contacted his mother to make arrangements for his funeral. An observer in the back of the plane, Des, as he is known, was the last of the crew to crawl out through the cracked fuselage and was doused in petrol. The grass outside was alight and he went up in flames, burned all over but for the areas covered by his US-issue flying jacket and boots. Des was lucky enough to find his way to Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, under the care of the pioneering plastic surgeon Sir Archibald McIndoe. There, he underwent more than two years of painful experimental surgery. 

Sir Archibald, realising how the badly burnt and disfigured men on his wards were struggling to adapt to everyday life, decided to give their morale a boost. Formed in June 1941 with just 39 members, by the end of the war they numbered 649. Primarily a drinking club, with social events and trips into the town, the group formed close bonds for life, while Sir Archibald developed plastic surgery techniques some of which are still in use today. Today, only 17 members of the Guinea Pig Club survive in the UK, their numbers dwindling as the men enter their mid-90s. A commemorative monument is being unveiled by the Duke of Edinburgh at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire, recognising the work of Sir Archibald, who died in 1960, and the bravery of his Guinea Pigs. 

Photographs of men being treated during World War Two feature these tubes, often connecting their noses with skin on their torso or arms. Modern developments including microsurgery, in which the blood vessels of a skin graft can be reattached at the new site, eliminated the need for this type of procedure. Sir Archibald’s legacy has endured, not least at the Queen Victoria Hospital, now the leading burns and reconstructive surgery centre in the south-east of England. 

Keywords: [“Archibald”,”Sir”,”surgery”]
Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-37840480