Guinea Pig Health News for October 01 2017

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Guinea pigs

Guinea pigs come from South America , and more precisely from the Andean region. So they inhabited the area of current Peru, Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia. Guinea pigs were bred for meat and for medical purpose. Currently, wild pigs are rare, although it is still possible to observe them in the Andes area. In southern America guinea pigs are still bred for food. If you go to Peru, where guinea pigs are particularly popular, avoid dishes, containing the word cavia. Wild guinea pigs aren’t divided into races – people after domesticating them, bred a few breeds. Wild pigs have short, smooth fur in one colour – grey-brown colouration called aguti. Domesticated pigs are squat and less agile than their wild ancestors. Guinea pigs were brought to Europe in the 16th century. From the beginning they were used as domestic animals, later also as laboratory animals, but they were supplanted by mice and rats, which reproduce much better.
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The Guinea Pig State

No one who’s watched developments over that quarter-century should be surprised that, once again, Oregon’s attempt to provide health care coverage to everyone in the state has culminated in a nationally embarrassing failure. Nearly two decades before the word “Obamacare” crossed anyone’s lips, Oregon legislators were trying to realize their own progressive vision of universal health care by expanding Medicaid and mandating that employers provide health insurance. In response to Howard’s death, the Oregon legislature embarked on an ambitious attempt to fix the state health care system. In the state legislature, he had opposed funding transplants for Medicaid patients, arguing the money would be better spent on other health care priorities. When given a chance to reform the state’s health care system, Kitzhaber doubled down on his belief that the amount of health care paid for by the state should be limited. Summarizing the Oregon Health Plan, the British Medical Journal explained, “States tend to favour two approaches to control costs in Medicaid: they either pay providers less or reduce the number of people eligible. Oregon rejected both methods and instead opted for a new, bold approach: it would ration the benefits covered under Medicaid.” Kitzhaber believed that rationing health care would be the best of both worlds-it would allow the state to expand Medicaid services to more people and control costs at the same time. “The state never seriously attempted to get the necessary federal waiver to create the employer mandate portion of the program. Thus, from the start, the OHP became a Medicaid experiment rather than a serious attempt to achieve universal health care coverage.” Clearly, the state was having second thoughts about whether forcing small businesses to provide health insurance would generate inordinate political fallout. Even with rationing, the state sought to further reduce costs and to oversee implementation by herding Medicaid patients into tightly regulated health maintenance organizations contracted by the state. The Oregon Health Plan’s mental health and dental benefits were actually superior to those offered under commercial insurance in the state. ODS Health Plan stopped offering the state plan in three rural counties because of nearly $1 million in losses. “Its budget swelled from $1.33 billion in 1993-1995 to $2.36 billion in 1999-2001,” according to Willamette Week, which also noted that the Oregon Health Plan had prompted “a surge of public hostility toward HMOs.” As if that weren’t enough, Oregon endured arguably the worst state economy in the country during the recession of the early 2000s. The “Oregon Medicaid experiment,” as it came to be known, was performed by respected health care experts-including MIT’s Jonathan Gruber, a key architect of Massachusetts’s health care reform and one of Obamacare’s biggest defenders. According to a 2009 state workforce survey, “Two-thirds of physicians report only sometimes or never being able to find inpatient mental health services for Medicaid patients. That increases to three-quarters for outpatient mental health services.” If serious mental illness is the one area of slight improvement in outcomes, it’s in spite of the fact that those in the Oregon Health Plan have a very hard time getting treatment for mental problems. Meet the new Oregon Health Plan, same as the old failed Oregon Health Plan.
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