Guinea Pig Health News for November 26 2017

Managing Pig Health: A Reference for the Farm

The book is a comprehensive reference guide to managing pig health, with the emphasis on health, on the premise that managing health is the primary way to effectively prevent and tackle disease. The book covers each element of pig health management starting with an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the pig. Managing Pig Health, a reference for the farm – the new, updated edition of the original “Green pig book”, Managing Pig Health and the Treatment of Disease offers a fresh and comprehensive guide to practical veterinary information for pig farmers, veterinarians and technologists around the world. The book is a comprehensive reference guide to managing pig health. The emphasis on health has been reinforced, on the premise that managing health is the primary way to effectively prevent and tackle disease. Managing Pig Health was written with a clear objective – to help the pig producer or advisor understand and manage health on the farm, including identifying health/disease issues that arise. Managing Pig Health aims to provide an understanding of the issues at stake to ensure best practices, best health and welfare and maximise the productivity of pig farms. The book maintains its original 17 chapters covering the various elements of on-farm pig health management starting with an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the pig. The second chapter “Understanding Health and Disease” looks at infectious and non-infections agents and how they impact the health of the pig, both individually and at a farm level. There is a comprehensive section on recognising health problems on the farm, managing the environment, staff training, use of records and planning for efficient production. Managing Pig Health retains its comprehensive coverage of pig health by detailing management practices, diseases, observations and procedures at each stage of the production cycle from reproduction, through gestation to farrowing and on through the weaner, grower and finishing periods. Finally, Managing Pig Health also covers surgical and practical procedures and health and safety issues on the farm.
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The Laboratory Rabbit, Guinea Pig, Hamster, and Other Rodents

The risk of acquiring a disease from laboratory animals has decreased since most laboratory animals are now produced with defined microbiologic profiles. On occasion there are situations where wild animals or field-collected animals are required for research. The use of wild rodents or field-collected rodents may expose the research staff to diseases that have been eliminated from research colonies. The occupational health concern of exposure to animal antigens is also discussed. Both prevention and engineering standards are discussed that will lower the exposure to the animal antigens. The risk of acquiring a disease from many types of laboratory animals has decreased because most laboratory animals are now produced with defined microbiologic profiles but there are still instances when wild animals or field-collected animals are required for research. The use of wild rodents or field-collected rodents may expose the research staff to diseases that have been excluded, if not eliminated, from research colonies. For some parasitic diseases, humans can serve as an intermediate host; for others humans are the final host of the parasite. In the latter case, the elimination of the intermediate host should prevent the complete lifecycle and protect the laboratory animal worker. Knowledge about the transmission of the disease plays an important part in effectively reducing the risk of the pathogen. The focus here is to review diseases that might be present in research animals and might be transmitted to immunocompetent research staff during experiments. Finally, allergic reactions to laboratory animals are discussed in the chapter because exposure to animal allergens represents a significant risk to personnel who handle animals.
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Are you a guinea pig?

The answer to that question – or at least what should be the answer – is the name of a new campaign launched today by Environmental Defense Fund, in cooperation with the Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families coalition and a number of its member organizations. I Am Not a Guinea Pig is a new online campaign that provides tools and information Americans from all walks of life can use to press for fundamental reform of our nation’s toxic chemical law, the Toxic Substances Control Act. I Am Not a Guinea Pig is aimed at helping to ensure that the voices of millions of Americans who are concerned about and affected by exposures to untested and unsafe chemicals are heard as Congress begins the first serious effort to overhaul the 34-year-old TSCA. The campaign will use a variety of social media, including a website, a Facebook page with daily updates, and a #NAGP Twitter hashtag. Our thanks go out to our partners in Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families with whom we’ve worked in our initial effort: Autism Society, Health Care Without Harm, Learning Disabilities Association of America, Moms Rising, Reproductive Health Technologies Project and Teens Turning Green. The campaign initially focuses on three groups at particular risk from toxic chemical exposures: teens, children and health professionals. We’ll be expanding the campaign over time to include others at risk, and we’ll continue until we’ve achieved the campaign’s fundamental aim: a strong new chemicals policy in the United States that protects all Americans from toxic chemicals.
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